Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park , Connecticut

Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park preserves the remains of a Revolutionary War fort that was the scene of a famous and controversial attack by British forces under the notorious Benedict Arnold. On September 6, 1781, Arnold’s forces landed near Groton, Connecticut and advanced against the fort, which was garrisoned by about 150 colonial militia and local men under the command of Colonel William Ledyard. The British regulars quickly captured the fort. What happened next is a matter of controversy. The Americans claimed that Ledyard gave up his sword in surrender, only to be immediately killed along with 88 of his men. The British version of events makes no mention of the massacre or the manner of Ledyard’s death. Whatever the truth about the massacre, the entire battle had lasted only 40 minutes.

The fort is located at the corner of Monument St. and Park Ave., in Groton, Connecticut 06340 (exit 87 off I-95).

Congaree Swamp National Monument, South Carolina

Congaree Swamp National Monument preserves the largest intact tract of old-growth floodplain forest in North America. The old-growth forest has some of the tallest trees in the eastern United States, with one of the highest canopies in the world. The floodplain (it is not a true swamp) contains remarkably diverse animal and plant life, including approximately 90 tree species. In the early twentieth century, the old-growth forest had been threatened by logging operations. When relatively high timber prices prompted private landowners to consider resuming logging operations in 1969, a “grass roots” campaign organized to protect the forest, and Congress established Congaree Swamp National Monument in 1976.

Congaree Swamp is located off of South Carolina Highway 48 (Bluff Road) approximately 20 miles southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina Highway 48 is accessible from Interstate 77 via exit 5 and from Interstate 26 from Charleston via South Carolina Highway 601. Follow the brown and white directional signs once on South Carolina Highway 48.

Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia

Independence National Historical Park, located in downtown (‘Center City’) Philadelphia, features two icons of American history. Independence Hall was originally the State House of the Pennsylvania colony. The Continental Congress first met there in 1774, and adopted the Declaration of Independence there in 1776. Later, the Confederation Congress and the Constitutional Convention also met in Independence Hall. The Liberty Bell, which was originally the official bell of the Pennsylvania State House, is housed in a special display center just down the street from Independence Hall.

Location Information and directions