Adams National Historic Site, Massachusetts

The first father and son to have both served as U.S. presidents were John and John Quincy Adams. Both John and John Quincy had long and distinguished careers in public service. For both, the presidency was the least successful and probably least satisfying experience in public service. John and John Quincy Adams were the only two one-term presidents among the first six men to hold the offcie. Both were driven from office by the leaders of broad popular movements against the more elitist style of politics represented by the Adamses. The Adams National Historic Site includes the birthplaces of John and John Quincy Adams, as well as the “Old House,” which was home to four generations of the Adams family. The site also includes the United First Parish Church, where both Presidents and their First Ladies are entombed in the Adams family crypt.

From Boston and Route 128: Traveling south on U.S. Interstate 93 or Route 128, take exit 7 – Route 3 south to Braintree and Cape Cod. Take the first exit off Route 3 south – exit 18, Washington Street and the Quincy Adams T. Continue straight on Burgin Parkway through six sets of traffic lights. At the seventh set of traffic lights, turn right onto Dimmock Street. Follow Dimmock Street one block to the intersection of Hancock Street. Turn right onto Hancock Street. The National Park Service Visitor Center, located in the Galleria at President’s Place is two blocks on your left, 1250 Hancock Street. Parking is in the garage in the rear of the building, turn left just before the building. From Cape Cod: Traveling north on Route 3, take exit 19, Quincy Adams T. Quincy Center. Continue straight on Burgin Parkway through six sets of traffic lights. At the seventh set of traffic lights, turn right on to Dimmock Street. Follow Dimmock Street one block to the intersection of Hancock Street. Turn right on to Hancock Street. The National Park Service Visitor Center located in the Galleria at Presidents Place is two blocks on your left, 1250 Hancock Street. Validated parking is in the garage in the rear of the building, turn left just before the building.

John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Massachusetts

John F. Kennedy Library and Museum is part of the Presidential Library System administered by the National Archives and Records Administration. The research collections of the Kennedy Library comprise nearly 34,000,000 million pages of documents and manuscript material, more than 1,000 oral history interviews, 147,000 photographs, 6,600 reels of film, nearly 11,000 reels of audiotape, and 25,000 cataloged books. Contact the library for information about access to the library’s collections. The museum houses a variety of permanent and temporary exhibits on the life and career of John F. Kennedy, the Kennedy family, and twentieth century American history.

The Kennedy Library is located on Columbia Point in Boston, close to route I-93. From the South: Route 3/I-93 (Southeast Expressway) to Dorchester. Take Exit 14 to Morrissey Boulevard. Follow signs to the University of Massachusetts and JFK Library. Buses take Exit 15, turn right off ramp and follow signs. From the North: Route I-93 or Route I-95 south to Boston and onto Southeast Expressway (Route 3/I-95). Take Exit 15, follow signs to the University of Massachusetts and JFK Library.

Longfellow National Historic Site

Longfellow House has seen a lot more history than your average old house. George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the newly-formed Continental Army, used the house as his headquarters during the Siege of Boston from July 1775 to April 1776. For almost half a century (1837-1882), the house was the home of poet and novelist Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. During that time, the house was a favorite gathering place for many prominent writers, artists, and public figures, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Julia Ward Howe, and Charles Sumner. After Longfellow’s death in 1882, his family continued to preserve the property for ninety years until it was transferred to the National Park Service in 1972. As a result, virtually all of the furnishings are original to the house, and most date from Henry Longfellow’s occupancy. Today, the national historic site also houses an extensive museum collection: American and European decorative arts from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; important nineteenth century painters and sculptors such as Gilbert Stuart and Albert Bierstadt; Longfellow’s personal library and family papers dating from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries; and an estimated 700,000 manuscript items, including letters from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles Dickens, and Abraham Lincoln. The following notice is on the National Park Service’s home page for the Longfellow National Historic Site: “Longfellow National Historic Site closed temporarily to visitors beginning October 25, 1998 for an indefinite period. The temporary closure will allow the National Park Service to make critical improvements to fire protection, security, and environmental control systems, collections storage, handicapped access, and education program space. Comprehensive rehabilitation of this popular visitor site, which includes the Longfellow House and its gardens and grounds, is scheduled to begin in Spring, 2000.”

Location Map and Directions: Click Here

Links: Longfellow National Historic Site Offical Web Site