Fort McClary State Historic Site, Maine

The first fortifications were erected on Kittery Point during the French and Indian Wars in the eighteenth century. Fort McClary was occupied during the Revolutionary War but never attacked by the British. The fortifications were strengthened several times during the nineteenth century, and the fort continued to be garrisoned during the War of 1812, the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, and World War I. Although Fort McClary is one of the few forts in the country that was in active service during five wars, it never came under fire. The buildings preserved in the present state historic site come from several different periods during which the fort was garrisoned.

Fort McClary State Historic Site is located at Kittery Point Road, Route 103, in Kittery, Maine 03904, two and a half miles from U.S. Route 1 and Maine Turnpike on Kittery Point Road (Route 103) (turn at rotary).

Congaree Swamp National Monument, South Carolina

Congaree Swamp National Monument preserves the largest intact tract of old-growth floodplain forest in North America. The old-growth forest has some of the tallest trees in the eastern United States, with one of the highest canopies in the world. The floodplain (it is not a true swamp) contains remarkably diverse animal and plant life, including approximately 90 tree species. In the early twentieth century, the old-growth forest had been threatened by logging operations. When relatively high timber prices prompted private landowners to consider resuming logging operations in 1969, a “grass roots” campaign organized to protect the forest, and Congress established Congaree Swamp National Monument in 1976.

Congaree Swamp is located off of South Carolina Highway 48 (Bluff Road) approximately 20 miles southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina Highway 48 is accessible from Interstate 77 via exit 5 and from Interstate 26 from Charleston via South Carolina Highway 601. Follow the brown and white directional signs once on South Carolina Highway 48.

Harry S Truman National Historic Site, Missouri

Harry S Truman (1884-1972), 33rd President of the United States, lived from 1919 until his death in a white Victorian house at 219 North Delaware Street in Independence, Missouri. The house was known as the “Summer White House” during the Truman administration (1945-1953). Harry S Truman National Historic Site includes the Independence home and the Truman Farm Home in Grandview, Missouri, both within the Kansas City metropolitan area. Built in 1894 by Harry Truman’s maternal grandmother, the Farm Home is the centerpiece of a 5.25-acre remnant of the family’s former 600-acre farm. Mr. Truman worked the farm as a young man, from 1906-1917.

The visitor center is located at the intersection of Truman Road and Main Street, in historic Fire Station No.1. From the north or south, take I-435 to the Truman Road exit. Travel east on Truman Road three miles (you’ll pass the Truman Home at Delaware Street). From the east or west, take I-70 to the Noland Road exit. Travel north on Noland Road four miles to Truman Road. Turn west on Truman Road and travel two blocks. To Grandview: The Truman Farm Home is located amid the retail and commercial district along Blue Ridge Boulevard. From the east or west, take I-435 and exit southbound on Route 71. From the north or south, travel Route 71 and take the Blue Ridge Boulevard exit. Travel west one mile. The Farm Home is on the left, set back from the road.